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Law Office of James D. Lynch, PLLC

3000 Joe Dimaggio Blvd #90, Round Rock, TX 78665

info@jimlynchlaw.com

(512) 745-6347

(714) 745-3875

©2020 by Law Office of James D. Lynch, PLLC. The information contained in this website is for informational purposes and is not to be considered legal advice.  Any correspondence between you and the Law Office of James D. Lynch is not intended to create an attorney-client relationship.  Please do not send confidential information to us until after an attorney-client relationship has been established by an engagement letter signed by the proposed client and our attorney.

  • James D. Lynch

Here’s How the IRS Contacts Taxpayers

Everyone should know how the IRS contacts taxpayers. This will help people avoid becoming a victim of scammers who pretend to be from the IRS with a goal of stealing personal information. Here are some facts about how the IRS communicates with taxpayers:


● When the IRS needs to contact a taxpayer, the first contact is normally by letter delivered by the U.S. Postal Service.


● The IRS does NOT normally initiate contact with taxpayers by email or phone.


● The IRS does NOT send text messages or contact people through social media.


● IRS revenue agents or tax compliance officers may call a taxpayer or tax professional after mailing a notice to confirm an appointment or to discuss items for a scheduled audit.


● Private debt collectors can call taxpayers for the collection of certain outstanding inactive tax liabilities, but only after the taxpayer and their representative have received written notice.


● IRS revenue officers will request payment of taxes owed by the taxpayer. However, taxpayers should remember that payment will never be requested to a source other than the U.S. Treasury.


● When visited by someone from the IRS, the taxpayers should always ask for credentials. IRS representatives can always provide two forms of official credentials: a pocket commission and a Personal Identity Verification Credential.