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Law Office of James D. Lynch, PLLC

3000 Joe Dimaggio Blvd #90, Round Rock, TX 78665

info@jimlynchlaw.com

(512) 745-6347

(714) 745-3875

©2020 by Law Office of James D. Lynch, PLLC. The information contained in this website is for informational purposes and is not to be considered legal advice.  Any correspondence between you and the Law Office of James D. Lynch is not intended to create an attorney-client relationship.  Please do not send confidential information to us until after an attorney-client relationship has been established by an engagement letter signed by the proposed client and our attorney.

  • James D. Lynch

Jus Sanguinis vs. Jus Soli

In the United States, a newborn child can acquire U.S. citizenship at birth through the legal principles of “jus soli” or “jus sanguinis.”


Jus soli is the right to citizenship of anyone born within the nation’s boundaries. In other words, a child born on U.S. soil is automatically a U.S citizen at birth.


Jus sanguinis is the right to citizenship based on the citizenship of one’s parents. Children may automatically be U.S. citizens at birth if either or both parents are U.S. citizens.


Anyone acquiring U.S. citizenship through jus soli or jus sanguinis does not need to go through the naturalization process. Naturalization is the conferring of U.S. citizenship upon a person who did not acquire U.S. citizenship at birth after the person completes the required steps to naturalization (application, fees, interview, tests, etc.)